Saturday, 9 February 2013

Song Saturday - Are You In the Mood?






Glenn Miller, of course. In the Mood.

Snow? That Ain't Snow.


Snow? That ain't snow. This is snow. Buncha candy asses on the East Coast.

See note at end.

Photos from Tess' Street.












Okay, to be fair. That isn't this year. This year has been very mild and we do not have that much snow.


This is from two years ago. But, still. East Coast people need to stop being candy asses about a litle snow fall.

Are You Shitting Me? Americans Have Lost Their Minds!


Are you fucking kidding me?

I swear to God. The United States has become a nation where over half it's citizens are idiots and it's public school system is geared up not to educated but to produce more idiots. And from the falling test scores across the nation, doing it well it would seem. Schools are no longer institutions of learning but institutions of social enforcement where every deviancy is advanced and common sense has been forgotten.

In amongst all the stories about children being suspended from school for bringing toy guns or constructing them from Legos or paper or pointing their .223 calibre fingers, now this.

A seven year old child in Colorado has been suspended from school for saving the world from evil. He threw an imaginary grenade at an imaginary box to save the world from the imaginary evil it contained.
Me? I cannot imagine that schools are now run by people this fucking moronic. Come on. Even you brain dead leftists. Can you not see this has gone too far?

I used to take me real gun and my real ammo to school with me and turn them in at the office until after school when I would pick them up so I could go hunting with my uncle.

In grade school we played Cowboys and Indians with pretend gun and hatchets. We played WWII soldiers. It didn't harm a one of us. You people south of the 49th have become crazy.

Wintery Knight says:

Boy suspended for trying to save the world from evil with imaginary weapon

From the Denver Post.

Excerpt:
 A 7-year-old Mary Blair Elementary School student says he’s confused about getting in trouble for trying to save the world from evil, though Thompson School District officials contend that the boy broke one of the school’s “absolutes.”

Parent Mandie Watkins said Mary Blair principal Valerie Lara-Black called her Friday afternoon to inform her that her second-grade son, Alex, had been suspended for throwing an imaginary grenade during recess on the playground.

Alex did not have anything in his hand at the time and made no threats toward other people, Watkins reportedly was told.

Watkins said Alex’s story matched up with the principal’s account: He threw the pretend grenade at an imaginary box that had something evil inside.

He was going to save the earth this way, and when he threw the grenade he pretended that the box exploded, in apparent success.
I keep finding these stories where people are astonished to find that no bystanders will help them when they are attacked by criminals. People today just look the other way instead of helping. Why is that? May I suggest it’s because schools are indoctrinating young people in moral relativism and demonizing the use of force to punish evil. Don’t expect men to come to your rescue if you teach them not to do it. The same people who complain that men don’t “man up” are often the ones that want them to act more like women. Maybe we need to have more men in teaching and administration positions in schools so that they are not so controlling and coercive when handling the better instincts of young men.


The Denver Post article says:

LOVELAND -- A 7-year-old Mary Blair Elementary School student says he's confused about getting in trouble for trying to save the world from evil, though Thompson School District officials contend that the boy broke one of the school's “absolutes.”

Parent Mandie Watkins said Mary Blair principal Valerie Lara-Black called her Friday afternoon to inform her that her second-grade son, Alex, had been suspended for throwing an imaginary grenade during recess on the playground.

Alex did not have anything in his hand at the time and made no threats toward other people, Watkins reportedly was told.

Watkins said Alex's story matched up with the principal's account: He threw the pretend grenade at an imaginary box that had something evil inside.
He was going to save the earth this way, and when he threw the grenade he pretended that the box exploded, in apparent success.

“He is very confused,” Watkins told the Reporter-Herald on Tuesday. “I'm confused as well, so it makes it hard for me to enforce these rules when I don't even understand them.”

The rules are laid out by Mary Blair Elementary School in a list of “absolutes” that are posted on the school's website and are aimed at making Mary Blair a safe environment.

Included in those absolutes are no physical abuse or fighting – real or play – and the no-weapons absolute also covers real or play weapons.

District policy does not prohibit imaginary weapons, but Superintendent Stan Scheer said individual schools are permitted to add enhancements to the general student code of conduct.

“It fell under that set of local policy they have in the building, and it was shared with all parents in the community at the beginning of the year,” Scheer said.

The district does not discuss disciplinary issues, but Scheer said there's more to the story than he was able to comment on.

“There's a whole student side that we just don't talk about,” he said. “It's a bit one-sided with the parent's point of view.”

Watkins said her son has been in trouble one other time at the school, for accessing other students' reading accounts on the computer, but she has not been informed of him making threats or acting violent.

According to Mary Blair's absolutes procedure, a student is allowed two non-severe, non-suspension occurrences, and a third occurrence leads to a formal suspension. Every absolute that is broken following the first suspension automatically results in a suspension.

Watkins has a meeting Wednesday with Lara-Black and Paul Bankes, director of elementary education. She's hoping to get the suspension lifted and would also like the rule itself to be revised.

“They need to have rules that are clear-cut, easy to understand and realistic for this age group,” Watkins said.